ANU Library recommendations for summer reading

17 December 2018

It’s summer break – and we have some fantastic recommendations for your summer reading list.

We asked ANU Library branch managers, ANU Press and Open Research to put together a list of some fantastic titles to enrich and entertain you over the summer break!

    ANU Press

    Read till it shatters: nationalism and identity in modern Thai literature

    Read till it shatters: nationalism and identity in modern Thai literature introduces readers to modern Thai literature through the themes of modernity, nationalism, identity and gender. ‘Read till it shatters’ is a Thai phrase instructing readers to deconstruct texts.

    Popular music, stars and stardom

    Popular music, stars and stardom delves into the popular fascination with fame and stardom that reaches into almost every facet of public life. Chapters demonstrate the variety of work being undertaken in stardom studies by Australian scholars.

    Pacific Exposures: photography and the Australia-Japan relationship

    Pacific Exposures: photography and the Australia-Japan relationship argues that photographs tell an important story of cultural production, response and reaction – not only about how Australians have pictured Japan over the decades, but how they see their own place in the Asia-Pacific. 

    Atlas of butterflies and diurnal moths in the monsoon tropics of Northern Australia

    Atlas of butterflies and diurnal moths in the monsoon tropics of Northern Australia compiles a comprehensive inventory to form a scientific baseline against which the extent and direction of change can be assessed in the future.

    Subscribe to be the first to know about new ANU Press titles.

    Art and Music Library

    Paper: material, medium and magic

    Paper: material, medium and magic this intriguing and beautifully produced book will change the way you relate to paper in an increasingly 'paperless' society. This fascinating book looks at every aspect of paper: its history, composition, production, application, and trade.

    Unlimited replays: video games and classical music

    Unlimited replays: video games and classical music explores the intersections of values and meanings where video games meet classical music, and vice versa. From the bleeps and bloops of 1980s arcades to the world’s most prestigious concert halls, classical music and video games have a long history together.

    Chifley Library

    Fight like a girl

    Fight like a girl through a mixture of memoir, opinion and investigative journalism, Clementine Ford exposes just how unequal the world continues to be for women. It will open your eyes to a brighter future where both men and women can flourish equally – and that is something worth fighting for.  

    Back from the brink: The Howard government

    Back from the brink: The Howard government this second volume of the Howard Government series explores the tumultuous and eventful years of 1997-2001. This includes an analyses of landmark events, such as native title, the 1998 election, violence in East Timor and the introduction of the GST.

    •	Hearts and minds: the untold story of the great pilgrimage and how women won the vote

    Hearts and minds: the untold story of the great pilgrimage and how women won the vote tells the remarkable and inspiring story of the suffragists’ march on London in 1913. This six-week protest march they call The Great Pilgrimage changed the personal and political lives of women in Britain forever. This text is both funny and moving, important and wonderfully entertaining.

    Hancock Library

    Paradoxes of time travel

    Paradoxes of time travel presents a wide-ranging exploration of puzzles raised by the possibility of time travel, including the grandfather paradox, the bootstrapping paradox, and the twin paradox of special relativity. This book is written in an accessible style, and filled with entertaining examples from physics, science fiction, and popular culture.

    A strange wilderness: the lives of the great mathematicians

    A strange wilderness: the lives of the great mathematicians investigates fascinating individuals and stories in the history of mathematics, exploring the quirky personalities behind some of the most profound, enduring theorems. This is not your typical textbook history: tales of duels, battlefield heroism, flamboyant arrogance, pranks, secret societies, imprisonment, feuds, theft, and even some fatal errors of judgment fill these pages.

    Dawn of the new everything: encounters with reality and virtual reality

    Dawn of the new everything: encounters with reality and virtual reality Jaron Lanier, the computer scientist largely credited with popularising virtual reality, reflects on his relationship with technology, VR’s ability to illuminate our understanding of human nature, and how the brain and body connect to the world.

    The invisible history of the human race : how DNA and history shape our identities and our futures

    The invisible history of the human race : how DNA and history shape our identities and our futures draws on cutting-edge research to reveal how both historical artifacts and DNA tell us where we come from and where we may be going. Author Christine Kenneally explores how everything from DNA to emotions to names and stories are all part of our human legacy.

    Sex, bombs and burgers: how war, porn and fast food created technology as we know it

    Sex, bombs and burgers: how war, porn and fast food created technology as we know it is a fast-paced, accessible history of technology based on fascinating research into the histories of all three industries. It includes interviews with inventors, experts, academics, executives and commentators.

    Frankenstein’s footsteps: science, genetics and popular culture

    Frankenstein’s footsteps: science, genetics and popular culture tracing the history of the development of biological science and how it has been received and understood by the public over two centuries, this intriguing book argues that the Frankenstein story governs much of today's debate about the onrushing new age of biotechnology.

    Ned Kelly: under the microscope

    Ned Kelly: under the microscope tells the fascinating behind-the-scenes stories of the science used in analysing Ned Kelly’s remains.

    Law Library

    East West Street: on the origins of “genocide” and “crimes against humanity”

    East West Street: on the origins of “genocide” and “crimes against humanity” is a moving personal detective story, an uncovering of secret pasts, and a book that explores the creation and development of world-changing legal concepts that came about as a result of the unprecedented atrocities of Hitler’s Third Reich.

    The missing masterpiece: a comedy in a state art gallery

    The missing masterpiece: a comedy in a state art gallery is a novel by former High Court judge. It is a satirical spoof on the snobbish world of art collectors. Ian Callinan uses his insider knowledge to have some fun at the expense of State art galleries – exposing a nexus of self-serving politicians, a gallery director’s lust for power and prestige, and a fair amount of gossip, intrigue and fraud.

    Menzies Library

    The Pacific : in the wake of Captain Cook with Sam Neill

    The Pacific : in the wake of Captain Cook with Sam Neill this book is based on a documentary series, in which actor and raconteur Sam Neill takes a deeply personal, present-day voyage to map his own understanding of Captain James Cook and the immense Pacific Ocean itself.

    The Oxford handbook of prehistoric Oceania

    The Oxford handbook of prehistoric Oceania presents the archaeology, linguistics, environment and human biology of Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia. First colonized 50,000 years ago, Oceania witnessed the independent invention of agriculture, the construction of Easter Island's statues, and the development of the word's last archaic states.

    Knowing China: a Twenty-First-Century guide

    Knowing China: a Twenty-First-Century guide this e-book explores contemporary China through a China-centric perspective to move beyond western preoccupations, desires, or fears. Each chapter starts with a key question about China, showing that such questions and assumptions are often based on a misunderstanding or misconstruction of what China is today.

    Oxford Handbook of Buddhist Ethics

    Oxford Handbook of Buddhist Ethics this online handbook is a comprehensive overview of the state of the field of Buddhist ethics, and contains balanced and critical review essays by international scholars.

    Open Research

    Generals of the South: the foundation and early history of the Three Kingdoms state of Wu

    Generals of the South: the foundation and early history of the Three Kingdoms state of Wu this volume of Rafe de Crespigny’s book is a must read for those interested in Chinese history. It investigates the development of the state of Wu, under control of the Sun family, in the territory south of the Yangzi.