Copyright for lecturers

The University provides a range of systems and advice to support use of published material for education purposes.

You can make material available through the Library’s e-reserve system, direct links to external resources (such as those to which the Library has a subscription) and via other repositories such as the ANU Open Research repository. Wattle is not a storage system for copies of publications.

Material is broadly made available to students:

  • through library purchasing
  • through school/college purchasing
  • by making copies under licences under the Copyright Act (s 113P)
  • where the material is openly accessible, out of copyright or available for use without access fees.

Textbooks 

Allowed:

  • A link can be placed to the full textbook if the textbook is freely available online (e.g., Creative Commons license) or has been purchased online by the Library or by the College/School.
  • 10% of the work or one chapter can be added to ANU Library’s e-reserve under the educational licence or other copyright permission. Information on the e-reserve can be found here.  Note: material copied under the educational licence is limited to students enrolled in the course.
  • Access can be provided to an ebook of a text if it is part of the ANU Library’s e-reserve.
  • A link on your Wattle site can be provided to material in ANU Library’s e-reserve.

Not allowed:

  • A publication, for example a book or journal article, cannot be uploaded to your Wattle site.  
  • A copy cannot be made of a hardcopy book or journal article or other published works and uploaded to a public website unless it fits an exception (for example the author has been dead for more than 70 years) or the original has been published under a Creative Commons licence.
  • You cannot make copies of a book and provide them to students without appropriate copyright permission for exception (such as Creative Commons licence).

Publications and Journal Articles

Allowed:

  • Linking rather than copying publications is recommended when using digital works. This will ensure that the students are accessing the final publication through the publishers or other authoritative source. Provide a link on your Wattle site to the University’s subscribed resource, e-reserve, publisher site or repository.
  • Under the statutory licence a copy of an article from a journal issue or book chapter can made available through the Library's e-reserve system.
  • Hard copies of the entire book or more than one article from a journal can be given out only if you have permission from the copyright holder or is out of copyright or published under a Creative Commons licence.

Not allowed:

  • A publication cannot be copied and made available to the public except in limited circumstances. Enquiries should be directed to the Library to determine if a work can be copied and made publically available. 
  • An article or book cannot be uploaded to Wattle. 

Film/TV Show (TP)

Allowed:

  • Films and programs can be shown in class using a copy which the university (most usually through the Library) has acquired with rights for educational use. These resources can be made available through a link.
  • Files or programs which have been published with clear information that they can freely be used for educational purposes can be shown. They can be made available to students through a link.
  • Films can be shown where the rights have expired that are online through a link (for example in the Internet Archive) or asking the Library to make a copy available on their streaming service. You can place a link in your Wattle site to the work.
  • Video material on YouTube can be shown through a link. Note: if the content is a broadcast that has been made available on YouTube by the broadcaster, the statutory licence is likely to apply.
    • Where a copy of material is made under the Broadcast licence, the copy must be clearly marked (see guide).
  • Programs can be shown in class to students participating by attending the class face to face or online (e.g., via Zoom or another platform).
  • Programs can also be recorded under the broadcast statutory licence for students to watch after the lecture.
  • Insubstantial amounts of films and programs (such as snippets/clips) can be used from films and TV as part of assessment tasks and in your lectures. The Wattle site can contain a link to these videos. 
  • Videos from YouTube, Vimeo, and other media platforms can be embedded into Wattle, websites, external blogs, and social media channels. 

Not allowed:

  • A film and/or part of a film cannot be uploaded to Wattle or similar learning management system or file share.  
  • Pirated material or illegal streaming services cannot be used.
  • Commercially produced DVDs cannot be streamed via streaming services, such as Mediasite, unless  the copyright owner’s permission has been obtained or the work acquired with a licence for educational use or it can be used under the statutory licence. 
    • In many cases the Library can make a copy or acquire copies.
  • Any screening or presentation containing copyright material cannot be recorded, copied, placed online, or shown as part of a public activity, unless rights have been obtained for example by permission of the copyright owner or through purchase.

Segment from a radio program (TP)

Allowed:

  • Radio broadcasts (including podcasts of broadcasts and broadcasts which have otherwise been made available online by the broadcaster) may be used in class as they are covered by the broadcast licence.  
  • Broadcasts may be recorded, copied, and communicated for the University's educational purposes, specifically to students who are enrolled in the course.  

Podcasts (TP) 

Allowed:

  • Podcasts can be streamed of television or radio programs originally broadcast by a free to air station in Australia and has then been made available as a podcast on the broadcaster’s website under the broadcast licence.
  • Podcasts can be streamed of overseas broadcasts where the material is available freely or for educational use.

Music (TP) 

Allowed:

  • Music and other sound recordings may be played in lectures and tutorials provided they are covered by the music licence or are available for such use without limit (e.g., Creative Commons licences).
  • The music license does not cover Grand Right Works being performed in a dramatic context, a choral work of more than 20 minutes' duration or an unlicenced arrangement. Rights will need to be separately acquired for this purpose.
  • Copied recordings may be made available to students in a physical or digital format, deposited in the Library for student access, placed on a server for student listening or downloading, or emailed to students. Access must be through a password restricted system that limits access to ANU staff and students.

Not allowed:

  • Copies of sheet music or other music cannot be made publicly available under the music licence.

Materials found on the Internet (BF)

Allowed:

  • You can link to resources on the Internet but ensure that the material you are linking to is of legal copies of works.
  • If you are copying material, only use material that gives the right to copying for education purposes, e.g. is identified as Creative Commons licensed.  Note: the copies should not be uploaded to Wattle.
  • Use websites where the copyright owner has given permission for the material to be included (see the Terms of Use for permitted and prohibited uses, and seek permission from the copyright owner of the website).  
  • Provide a link where possible.   
  • If you need to make a copy you can put that file into Alfresco provided access is restricted to those enrolled in the course. 

Not allowed:

  • Material that states it can't be freely reproduced or communicated to students cannot be used (ask for permission).
  • Material from any pirate websites cannot be used.

Image of an object/painting/artwork (BF)

Allowed:

  • An image can be used in teaching if: 
    • The Library has a subscription to the service which holds the copy of the artwork.
    • The website of the gallery/institution allows it to be used for educational purposes.
    • The original artwork is produced under a Creative Commons license that allows for reuse. 
    • The University is the copyright holder. 
    • Copyright in the artwork has expired (particularly applies to photographs). 
    • Permission has been granted by or on behalf of the copyright owner.
  • Diagrams and figures can be copied by hand from third-party copyright material during a lecture, but ensure appropriate citations if you capture these with a document camera or other means and make them available online to students.

Not allowed:

  • Locating an image of an artwork does not mean that the image or reproduction can be freely used. If in doubt ask the Library staff for advice.
  • Material that states it cannot be freely reproduced or communicated to students cannot be used (ask for permission).
  • Material from any pirate websites cannot be used.

Find open access material (BF)

Allowed:

Provide a copy or material to a single student (BF)

Allowed:

  • You can make a copy or communicate (such as sending as an attachment electronically) to a single student.

Reproduce materials for a student with a disability (BF)

Allowed:

  • Literary and dramatic works (or published editions) can be copied in full in any required accessible format and communicated to students with a print disability, provided that it is solely for the purpose of assisting students with print disabilities and they are not commercially available in that format. 
  • The print disability provisions can be used to reproduce material to assist a student for educational purposes; research and study, as well as for recreational or private use.
  • ANU Access & Inclusion provides alternative format support services

Not allowed:

  • Musical works such as sheet or notated music cannot be copied under the print disability provision.
  • If you wish to reproduce material other literary or dramatic works or for other disabilities, you will need to rely on one of the other provisions.

Make copies/scans of a textbook that only exists in hardcopy for my students (BF)

Allowed:

  • Talk to the Library about getting a licenced copy.
  • Otherwise, a reasonable portion may be reproduced through the Library’s e-reserve service:
    • If the work is published as an edition of 10 or more pages: 10% of the number of pages, or a chapter (if more than 10% of the pages).

YouTube video in lectures/tutorials (BF)

Allowed:

  • Content that is available on YouTube can be streamed in class directly from the YouTube site and provided as a link (not embedded file) in your Wattle site.
  • If you wish to make videos for your course and share them, the videos must not be stored on Wattle but can be stored in the CLT Learning Object system, Alfresco, or on a server in your school that has password protection that limits access to students enrolled in the course.
  • Videos with a Creative Commons Licence can be copied in a lecture and downloaded into the Learning Object Management System, Alfresco, or your local server. 
  • Programs can be shown in class to students participating by attending the class face to face or online (e.g., via Zoom or another platform).
  • Programs can also be recorded under the broadcast statutory licence for students to watch after the lecture.

Not allowed:

  • Do not link to illegally uploaded content.

Course Reader (BF)

Allowed:

  • Materials that are part of ANU Library's reserve.
  • Where articles are available electronically and copyright clearance is not required, a link to the resource can be used (link to the e-reserve guide).

Making publications available to your students 

How to ensure copyright compliance with a variety of content

I want to download an online textbook for my course and upload the whole book for students to read

  • Step 1
  • Check the with the ANU Library to see if the book is available digitally or can be ordered. If so, you can then link to the book.
  • Step 2
  • Check to see if the resource is it is freely available e.g., under the Creative Commons License. If it is available, we recommend either linking to the resource or adding it to the Library's e-reserve.
  • Step 3
  • If it cannot be acquired as an ebook, check the with the ANU Library about whether it can be digitised or whether part can be made available through the e-reserve service that provides access to publications or extracts from publications.

I want to use materials found on the Internet in lectures and/or tutorials

  • Step 1
  • Check to see if the resource can be freely used e.g., is published under a Creative Commons License. If it is available, we recommend linking to the resource.
  • Step 2
  • Check with the Library to see if a published copy is available.
  • Step 3
  • If no information is available, investigate further—contact the creator or web manager if possible for permission or information.
  • Step 4
  • If you are unsuccessful in getting a response in a reasonable time from the creator or web manager and the resource cannot be made accessible via a link (for example if the website is frequently unavailable) the Library may be able to store a copy.
  • Step 5
  • If you have put material in your courses or on your University website and the creator objects, and if upon investigation you find that you did not have permission to use this material, apologise and remove the material. This approach is consistent with the take down provisions in other countries and good practice.

I want to find open access material for my course

  • Step 1
  • Check these starting points to locate open access material:

    Images can be found in:

    • Flickr—use Advanced search to select ‘Only search within Creative Commons-licensed content’
    • Google images—select ‘free to use or share’ or other free use options.
  • Step 2
  • If using Creative Commons material, it is important to check which licence has been applied to understand the approved uses. There are six main Creatives Commons licences:
    • Attribution (CC BY): the material must be attributed to the creator
    • Attribution-ShareAlike (CC BY-SA): the material must be attributed to the creator, and your material must be licenced in the same way
    • Attribution-NoDerivs (CC BY-ND): the material must be attributed to the creator, and it cannot be adapted
    • Attribution-NonCommercial (CC BY-NC): the material must be attributed to the creator, and it cannot be used for commercial purposes
    • Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA): the material must be attributed to the creator, it cannot be used for commercial purposes, and your material must be licenced in the same way
    • Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND): the material must be attributed to the creator, it cannot be used for commercial purposes, and it cannot be adapted

I want to use an image of an object/painting/art work in my lectures/tutorials

  • Step 1
  • Does the Library subscribe? If yes, you can link to the Library subscribed copy.
  • Step 2
  • Is it freely available on the Internet? If yes, check the limitations and link to the copy.
  • Step 3
  • Has the copyright expired? If yes, check if you can copy/communicate.
  • Step 4
  • Is it published under a Creative Commons license? If yes, check if you can copy/communicate.
  • Step 5
  • Do you have permission from the copyright owner? If yes, check if you can copy/communicate.
  • Step 6
  • Is there a print copy? Can it be made available by the Library?
  • Step 7
  • Otherwise, it may be possible to make available via e- reserve.

Always attribute the work by providing enough information to identify the creator and the work e.g. author, title, publication year, source.

I want to provide a copy or material to a single student

  • Step 1
  • Make the copy and provided it to the student.

I want to Create a course reader in my lectures/tutorials

  • Step 1
  • See Adding materials to reserve & online (e-reserve)—a guide for lecturers on the Library website.
  • Submit course reading lists to the library, in addition to the course code, course name and citation details. This should be done in advance of semester start date. Previously submitted resources can be reactivated on request and do not need to be resubmitted, only provide a citation.
  • Step 2
  • Work with the relevant Library staff member.
  • When making a request:
    • include full citation details for all materials
    • include a copy of items that are only available in print
    • include documents as hardcopy or as pdf files (for pdf files use a CD or USB drive)
    • do not send printouts of items already available online through ANU subscription databases and the web.
  • Copies of articles and book chapters for scanning should:
      • include full citation details
      • be A4, clean, and straight on the page
      • have text that is clear and legible
      • have little or no black photocopy margin.
    • Step 3
    • Where articles are available electronically and copyright clearance is not required, you can link to the electronic version in the catalogue. 

I want to use a film or part of a film in lectures/tutorials

  • Step 1
  • Check if the University has a licence for a copy or whether a streaming video can be acquired.
  • Step 2
  • Check if it is available on another site e.g. YouTube/Internet Archive/Broadcaster.
  • Step 3
  • Place link in course material

I want to use a TV show in lectures/tutorials

  • Step 1
  • Check if the University has a licence for a copy or whether a streaming video can be acquired.
  • Step 2
  • Check if it is available on another site e.g. YouTube/Internet Archive/Broadcaster.
  • Step 3
  • Place link in course material

I want to use a segment from a radio program in lectures/tutorials

  • Step 1
  • Check if the University has a licence for a copy or whether a streaming video can be acquired.
  • Step 2
  • Check if it is available on another site e.g. YouTube/Internet Archive/Broadcaster.
  • Step 3
  • Place link in course material

I want to use a podcast in lectures/tutorials

  • Step 1
  • Check if the University has a licence for a copy or whether a streaming video can be acquired.
  • Step 2
  • Check if it is available on another site e.g. YouTube/Internet Archive/Broadcaster.
  • Step 3
  • Place link in course material

I want to use a YouTube video in lectures/tutorials

  • Step 1
  • Find resource in YouTube.
  • Step 2
  • Reference the work and link back to where you found it.

I want to use music/a song in lectures/tutorials

  • Step 1
  • Check if the music/song is included in the Music Licence agreement the University has with APRA/AMCOS, ARIA and PPCA. If it is, you can copy sound recordings and make them available to students for educational purposes.
  • Step 2
  • To make music/a song available to students, it must be on a secure site with a login and password required to access it.
  • Step 3
  • These materials need to be identified in WATTLE or the system you make the music available from with metadata clearly noting that it is made available under the music licence.
  • Step 4
  • Check with the Library if you would like to make a publicly accessible copy; “Grand Rights” or “Dramatic Context Performances” (of more than 20 minutes; copying sheet music and/or lyrics.

I want to copy material for my research

  • Step 1
  • The options enabling you to copy material include the following:
    • You may be the copyright holder.
    • The University may be the copyright holder.
    • The University may have a licence for use of the material that that allows you to make a copy—the Library can check licences for the material.
    • Copyright may have expired for the material.
    • The material may be published under a Creative Commons license that allows for reproduction without permission.
    • Reproduction falls within the fair dealing or other exceptions.
    • Reproduction occurs with permission of the creator.
    • You are copying an insubstantial portion of the material (outlined below)
  • Step 2
  • If you wish to use material that is not covered by the above cases you should consider:
  • asking the creator for permission to use the material; or
  • whether the fair use provisions of the Copyright Act 1968 will provide protection; or
  • whether your use is for review or criticism (this enables use under the fair use provisions of the Copyright Act 1968);
  • or
  • whether the Library has a license which covers this use.
  • Step 3
  • Always cite the material created by others that you quote or use in your publications accurately. There are a range of tools that you can use to record and/or store your references material including Mendeley, Zotero and Endnote. The Library offers training in these products
  • The University has a license for Endnote—you can download it from Wattle.

I want to reproduce materials for a student with a disability in an accessible format

  • Step 1
  • For students with a print disability, literary and dramatic works (or published editions) can be copied and communicated in full in any required accessible format, for educational purposes; research and study, as well as for recreational or private use, provided they are not commercially available in that format.
  • Step 2
  • Access & Inclusion provides the alternative format services.

I want to share material on a social networking site with my students

  • Step 1
  • Check that the material can be made available and use links to the material. Links can be made available to:
    • material subscribed to by the Library (students will need to login to see the material)
    • openly accessible material
    • material on YouTube
    • material on other ANU platforms (students will need to login to see the material).

I want to use a journal or journal article with my students

  • Step 1
  • Does the Library provide access to this journal? If yes, then you can link the article on your course Wattle site for the students to access.
  • Step 2
  • Is it open access for example Creative Commons licence? If yes, then you can link the article on your course Wattle site for the students to access.
  • Step 3
  • Has the copyright expired? If yes, then check you can copy/communicate.
  • Step 4
  • Do you have permission from the copyright owner? If yes, then check you can copy/communicate.
  • Step 5
  • Is there a print copy? Can it be made available under by the Library e-reserve system statutory licence?